THE JOURNEY TO KEEKOROK

A couple weeks back, I introduced you to our friends Jennifer and Gloria who agreed to help my son Lincoln with his “Buy Tangawizi a Bed” project. Since then we’ve been in touch, crunched the numbers, and I’m excited to tell you that the trip to find Tangawizi has been scheduled! Here are the details:

May 7th. Jennifer and Gloria have already booked a taxi to leave for Keekorok. They should arrive by evening, where Gloria’s friend (a tracker in the Mara) will greet them. They’ve already sent photos ahead of both Tangawizi and the photographer, hoping for a lead.

May 8th-10th. The ladies, with some help from Gloria’s friend, will search in the area for Tangawizi. Unlike searching for someone in the United States, this might be tricky. They plan to start with the schools- traveling from one to another asking children if they know Tangawizi. Granted, “Little T” (or as I like to call him, “Young ‘Weezy”) is probably not old enough for school. But between siblings and friends, we’re hoping this will be the quickest way to find him.

mara schooledited

Once they’ve found Tangawizi, Gloria and Jennifer will buy the bed locally. This will not only save them from carrying a bed all over the Serengheti, but also ensure that the bed is adaptable for Tangawizi’s family. Beyond the bed, we’re still hoping that the token of goodwill can be a means of connecting with Tangawizi’s family and community, and supporting them in the long-term. If there are immediate needs that Jennifer and Gloria can identify, we hope to take care of them promptly, as Lincoln has already raised more than enough to get Tangawizi a bed (see below.)

May 11th. The ladies will return to Nairobi. Lord willing, they’ll have been successful in the search.

Gloria gave us a break down of expenses for the trip:

“Prices are for Jennifer and myself together for a total of five days, travel there, travel back, and three days search. Based on the exchange rate of 85…

  • Car rental from Nairobi to Trans Mara and back and all the traveling while there: 17,500/= ($205.88)
  • Fuel: 18,000/= ($211.76)
  • Lodging: 8,000/= ($94)
  • Food: 5000/= ($58.82)
  • Interpreter from Swahili to Maa (mother tongue of the Masai): 3000/= ($35.29) – We will hire a Masai when we get there.

Total: 51,500= ($605.75)

And because I couldn’t resist: “Finding Tangawizi, getting him a bed, documenting the trip, and connecting two little boys from across the world: priceless!”

Lincoln has already raised $833.84 to buy Tangawizi a bed. Out of the extra funds raised, we want to (1) take care of any additional resources Tangawizi’s family might need, and (2) of course, pay our extremely generous couriers for offering to spend five days seeing this through. It’s worth mentioning that neither Jennifer or Gloria has asked us to pay them for their time. But for as kind as they’ve been, we want to offset costs they might incur for not being home for five days. If you’d like to connect with Jennifer and Gloria and help them reach the sick and poor of Kenya, you can help fund them at Project Agape Love and New Territory Ministries.

In twenty days these ladies will set out for Keekorok. That is exciting to type. We plan to have Lincoln draw a picture for Tangawizi and write him a letter. I’ll be sure to post both of them before the trip. Stay tuned!

We have more people to thank than we can even remember at this point. For everyone who’s donated, prayer, and spread the word…we thank you deeply. The more people have gotten involved, the more fun the story becomes. If you’d still like to get involved, you can do that in one of a few ways: (1) Sign up for updates in the “words & music” field to the right. I promise I won’t spam or send pics of naked Japanese people, and you can unsubscribe at any time; (2) Donate via PayPal at morrow_nick@hotmail.com. All extra funds will go to pay Jennifer and Gloria and buy essential resources for Tangawizi’s community; (3) Spread the word; (4) Pray. The truth is, finding Tangawizi in three days might be very, very difficult. The current rains in Kenya could also delay the trip. There are plenty of things that could go wrong. But I hold on to hope that God has something up His sleeve, and I’m confident our prayers will make a difference. All honor and glory and praise to God.

Comments (2)
  1. Athenry May 17, 2013 at 3:19 pm

    So many people claim to be religious but don’t show it in their actions, other people have the actions of saints but no faith. I’ve come to the conclusion that in the world there are good people and bad people; perhaps the only definitions worth their salt.

    You and your family are good people.

    And you seem to sum up the message of Christianity (as I understand it). I wish I had the selflessness that you all have, you’re truly inspiring.

    • Nick May 17, 2013 at 3:39 pm

      Thanks for the kind words. I’m not sure we can claim the “good people” status, but I completely agree with you. There is a huge disconnect in American society between faith and the way most people actually live. I’ve met a lot of Christians who don’t seem to be very interested in doing the things Jesus talked about (feeding the hungry, humbling ourselves, sacrificing for the sake of others.) And I’ve got a lot of atheist/agnostic friends that are constantly helping people and really like Jesus’ ideas…but are really turned off by the idea of Christianity.

      I think it’s because Christianity, in many ways, has morphed into the whole “get out of hell free card” idea. In the gospels, that doesn’t seem to be Jesus’ main concern. It seems to be more about connecting with God, and becoming like God through the power of God (Father, Son, Spirit interactions.) I share your sadness about it, I really do. Thanks for sharing.

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